Year of the Pig: Pigs in Chinese Culture
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Year of the Pig: Pigs in Chinese Culture

According to the Chinese calendar, 2019 is going to be the “Year of the Pig”. So today, let’s look at pigs in Chinese culture – and see how these animals have been regarded in China through history.   Pigs in Traditional Chinese Culture Since the dawn of time, Chinese people have had a special kind of affection towards...

Western TV Shows: Chinese Names
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Western TV Shows: Chinese Names

Western TV shows are popular all over the world, and China is no exception. People love to spend time watching their favorite TV shows, and we do, too. Once we got curious about what Western TV shows in China are popular, and what their Chinese names are, we discovered that some of them are very different...

Decoding The Ayi Language
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Decoding The Ayi Language

Sometimes after a long and busy day, you just can’t be bothered to do any cooking or clean your room. In China, it’s very popular among foreigners to hire an “阿姨ā yí”(which means cleaner) to help with their housework. Firstly, it’s not very expensive if you would like to ask a cleaner to come clean...

October 16, 2017March 6, 2018by
Words You Can Blurt Out When You’re Feeling Surprised
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Words You Can Blurt Out When You’re Feeling Surprised

Our life is full of uncertainties and surprises, therefore it’s always good to learn how to express your own feelings in words when you feel surprised about something. Today we will teach you for simple words that may come in handy when you feel “shocked”.   1. 天啊(tiān a): Oh god! “天(tiān)” means “sky” or...

September 18, 2017October 11, 2018by
Chinese Words with English Origins
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Chinese Words with English Origins

As China moves toward modernization in the recent years, it has become more tolerant towards foreign cultures. Many aspects of the western cultures have been adopted and adapted into local versions. Some of these can be seen/heard in the colloquial Chinese language, such as “脱口秀(tuōkǒuxiù)” sounds like and means “talk show” and “黑客(hēikè)” means “hacker”....

September 12, 2017March 6, 2018by
Chinese Words You Might Need
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Chinese Words You Might Need

1. 泡吧 pào bā to kill time in a bar Let’s break it down: 泡(pào): to soak 吧(bā): bar “泡吧(pào bā)” literally means “to soak yourself in a bar”. This word is often used to describe a person who likes to kill time in a bar. Examples: Young people like to kill time in bars....

September 11, 2017March 6, 2018by
How to Say “Pumped (Excited)” in Chinese
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How to Say “Pumped (Excited)” in Chinese

打 (dǎ) in this case means “to pump up”. 鸡血 (jī xuě) means “chicken blood”. Put together, the phrase 打鸡血 (dǎ jī xuě) is often used to describe a person who is pumped up about something.

June 14, 2017March 7, 2018by
How to Say “Thank you, boss.” in Chinese
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How to Say “Thank you, boss.” in Chinese

谢谢 (xiè xiè): to thank, or thank you 老板 (lǎo bǎn): boss 谢谢老板 (xiè xiè lǎo bǎn): “Thank you, boss.” In day-to-day use, whoever you’re saying this to doesn’t necessarily need to be your boss. It could be anyone who has given you something nice, or done you a favor.

June 14, 2017March 7, 2018by
How to Say “An Eyesore” in Chinese
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How to Say “An Eyesore” in Chinese

辣 (là): spicy, 眼睛 (yǎn jīng) We use this phrase to describe something which is unpleasant to see, something you wish you could unsee. It’s often used in a joking tone.

June 14, 2017March 7, 2018by
How to Say “to Panic” in Chinese
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How to Say “to Panic” in Chinese

方 (fāng) means “square”. We say 方了 (fāng le) when something unexpected has happened and you start to panic and don’t know what to do.  

June 14, 2017March 7, 2018by
How to Say “Feel Completely Lost” In Chinese
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How to Say “Feel Completely Lost” In Chinese

脸 (liǎn): face, 懵 (mēng): to feel lost Put together, 一脸懵逼 (yī liǎn mēng bī) literally means one’s face is full of the expression of feeling lost. We use it to describe a person who is feeling completely lost and doesn’t know what to say.  

June 14, 2017March 7, 2018by
How to Say “Bystanders” in Chinese
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How to Say “Bystanders” in Chinese

吃 (chī): to eat 瓜 (guā): melon 群众 (qún zhòng): crowds, masses Put together, this phrase literally means “the crowds of people who are eating melons”, and it’s usually used to refer to bystanders or gawkers who have nothing serious to do, and are only there to watch a show.  

June 14, 2017March 7, 2018by
How to Say “Upstart” in Chinese
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How to Say “Upstart” in Chinese

土豪 (tǔ háo) is used to describe someone who’s extremely rich, and is often used to refer to China’s nouveaux riches. The character 土 (tǔ) literally means “earth”, and is associated with China’s poor, unsophisticated rural areas. 豪 (háo) is part of the word 豪华 (háo huá) – luxurious. Used together, the term conjures up...

June 14, 2017March 7, 2018by
How to Say “Speechless” in Chinese
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How to Say “Speechless” in Chinese

醉 (zuì) literally means drunk. But when you hear people say, 我也是醉了 (wǒ yě shì zuì le) , they’re not trying to tell you they’re tipsy. They’re saying they’re speechless and won’t make further comment on something.    

June 14, 2017March 7, 2018by
How to Say “Internet Celebrity” in Chinese
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How to Say “Internet Celebrity” in Chinese

网 (wǎng) refers to the internet, or the web, 红 (hóng) means popular. 网红 (wǎng hóng) is a term that is used to refer to internet celebrities – people who have gained fame on social media.  

June 12, 2017July 25, 2018by
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